New technologies that changed our lives

Advertisement for an acoustic telephone system by the Consolidated Telephone Co., Jersey City, NJ 1886,  from "Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly Magazine" Vol. XXI, No. 1, January, 1886, New York: Frank Leslie (Publisher)   Digitised by Centpacrr on August 3, 2013

Advertisement for an acoustic telephone system by the Consolidated Telephone Co., Jersey City, NJ 1886, from “Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly Magazine” Vol. XXI, No. 1, January, 1886, New York: Frank Leslie (Publisher)
Digitised by Centpacrr on August 3, 2013

Technology is a part of our lives, and we seem to take it for granted. But do we, really? Looking at the different stages and revolutions of technology in relation to art and design practice as well as the products and services affecting the way practitioners work, think and live, this article explores the idea of generational identity through technology. Concerned with culture and expectations, technology penetration and the things we overlook and take for granted because of the time we were born, Sarah Kante takes us on a journey from the Gutenberg press to apps. Continue reading

Vibration: expression of human-material-digital systems

Everyday urban object

Over a third of humanity has access to mobile communications. Mobile phones are mainstream – visibly part of the cultural realm. Whilst connectivity is commonplace and expanding, inquiry into the place of these personal digital devices in cultural transformation, and in arts and design education, is in its early stage. At CSM we have already seen incremental shifts in some of the ways in which our students are using personal digital technologies and social media as part of their studies, and their use of these technologies will continue to change.

In order to gain insights about today’s relationships between people, digital technologies, and materials – within an art and design context – and to prepare ourselves for possible futures, it is worth exploring different ways of framing these associations. Continue reading

Ubiquitous computing: does this area shape the digital literacy map?

London

November morning in London

Increasingly smart objects are present in our public spaces. Digital technologies, whether immediately apparent or ‘hidden’, intervene in our sensory engagement with physical space and the ways in which we make meaning of the world. With this convergence of digital and material, and the expanding relationships/networks formed with humans, is ubiquitous computing something that we should be including within the realm of digital literacy in arts and design education? Continue reading