Skype at CSM: staff survey feedback

CSM MIT collaborative workshop using Skype

Historically Central Saint Martins has had a tricky relationship with Skype. For a number of years, and for a number of reasons, Skype services were not accessible through the university’s network. Whilst one argument maintained that the university’s ‘digital experience’ provision was less than staff and students would expect when outside of the institution, a counter claim was that Skype used excessive bandwidth and posed potential security issues for the university network as a whole. Both points were valid, and the situation highlights the complex issues faced by institutions worldwide when dealing with the rapid advancement of digital systems.

Today, however, as highlighted in the recent CSM Social Media and Digital Tools survey, there is a marked increase in the number of staff using Skype as part of their university life. Continue reading

CSM All Staff Digital Literacy Event

September’s all staff Digital Literacy event provided an opportunity for colleagues to find out about some of the ways in which digital tools and social media are being used at CSM.

To start off Shan Wareing, UAL’s Dean of Learning and Teaching, provided a contextual overview of ways in which digital technologies are being approached at the university, CLTAD’s Nancy Turner fed back on key themes arising from the recent international conference ‘Designs on E-Learning’, and Angus Eason gave an update on MOODLE. They were joined by CSM colleagues who gave quick-fire presentations about their own uses of digital technologies to support the student experience.

It was acknowledged that we are experiencing radical shifts in the variety and complexity of HE provision globally – for example, the current blossoming of massive open online courses (MOOCs) adds to the fluidity and multiplicity of educational provision, and provides new environments for learning.  This evolving and complex educational landscape is one in which digital technologies are playing an increasingly significant part, and as such, staff and students need to become digitally literate. Continue reading